Short Condor Explained

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Short Condor

The short condor is a neutral strategy similar to the short butterfly. It is a limited risk, limited profit trading strategy that is structured to earn a profit when the underlying stock is perceived to be making a sharp move in either direction.

Short Condor Construction
Buy 1 ITM Call
Sell 1 ITM Call (Lower Strike)
Buy 1 OTM Call
Sell 1 OTM Call (Higher Strike)

Using calls, the options trader can setup a short condor by combining a bear call spread and a bull call spread. The trader enters a short call condor by buying a lower strike in-the-money call, selling an even lower striking in-the-money call, buying a higher strike out-of-the-money call and selling another even higher striking out-of-the-money call. A total of 4 legs are involved in this trading strategy and a net credit is received on entering the trade.

Limited Profit Potential

The maximum possible profit for a short condor is equal to the initial credit received upon entering the trade. It happens when the underlying stock price on expiration date is at or below the lowest strike price and also occurs when the stock price is at or above the highest strike price of all the options involved.

The formula for calculating maximum profit is given below:

  • Max Profit = Net Premium Received – Commissions Paid
  • Max Profit Achieved When Price of Underlying = Strike Price of Higher Strike Short Call

Limited Risk

Maximum loss is suffered when the underlying stock price falls between the 2 middle strikes at expiration. It can be derived that the maximum loss is equal to the difference in strike prices of the 2 lower striking calls less the initial credit taken to enter the trade.

The formula for calculating maximum loss is given below:

  • Max Loss = Strike Price of Lower Strike Long Call – Strike Price of Lower Strike Short Call – Net Premium Received + Commissions Paid
  • Max Loss Occurs When Price of Underlying is in between the Strike Prices of the 2 Long Calls

Breakeven Point(s)

There are 2 break-even points for the short condor position. The breakeven points can be calculated using the following formulae.

  • Upper Breakeven Point = Strike Price of Highest Strike Short Call – Net Premium Paid
  • Lower Breakeven Point = Strike Price of Lowest Strike Short Call + Net Premium Paid

Example

Suppose XYZ stock is trading at $45 in June. An options trader executes a short condor by selling a JUL 35 call for $1100, buying a JUL 40 call for $700, buying another JUL 50 call for $200 and selling another JUL 55 call for $100. A net credit of $300 is received on entering the trade.

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To further see why $300 is the maximum possible profit, lets examine what happens when the stock price falls to $35 or rise to $55 on expiration.

At $35, all the options expire worthless, so the initial credit taken of $300 is his maximum profit.

At $55, the short JUL 55 call expires worthless while the profit from the long JUL 40 call (worth $1500) and the long JUL 50 call (worth $500) is used to offset the short JUL 35 call worth $2000 . Thus, the short condor trader still earns the maximum profit that is equal to the $300 initial credit taken when entering the trade.

On the flip side, if XYZ stock is still trading at $45 on expiration in July, only the JUL 35 call and the JUL 40 call expire in the money. With his long JUL 40 call worth $500 and the initial credit of $300 received to offset the short JUL 35 call valued at $1000, there is still a net loss of $200. This is the maximum possible loss and is suffered when the underlying stock price at expiration is anywhere between $40 and $50.

Note: While we have covered the use of this strategy with reference to stock options, the short condor is equally applicable using ETF options, index options as well as options on futures.

Commissions

Commission charges can make a significant impact to overall profit or loss when implementing option spreads strategies. Their effect is even more pronounced for the short condor as there are 4 legs involved in this trade compared to simpler strategies like the vertical spreads which have only 2 legs.

If you make multi-legged options trades frequently, you should check out the brokerage firm OptionsHouse.com where they charge a low fee of only $0.15 per contract (+$4.95 per trade).

Similar Strategies

The following strategies are similar to the short condor in that they are also high volatility strategies that have limited profit potential and limited risk.

Short Condor (Short Call Condor) Options Trading Strategy Explained

Published on Thursday, April 19, 2020 | Modified on Sunday, July 21, 2020

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Short Condor (Short Call Condor) Options Strategy

Strategy Level Advance
Instruments Traded Call
Number of Positions 4
Market View Volatile
Risk Profile Limited
Reward Profile Limited
Breakeven Point

A Short Call Condor (or Short Condor) is a neutral strategy with a limited risk and a limited profit. The short condor strategy is suitable for a high volatile underlying.

The goal of this strategy is to profit from a stock price moving up or down beyond the highest or lowest strike prices of the position.

The strategy is similar to Short Call Butterfly strategy with the difference being in the strike prices selected.

Suppose Nifty is currently trading at 10,400. If the trader is expecting high volatility in the index due to specific events i.e. budget, results, and elections, he could choose the Short Condor strategy to profit in such a market scenario. The strategy could be constructed as below:

Short Condor Options Strategy

In Short Condor, a Bear Call Spread and a Bull Call Spread combined into 1 strategy as shown in above example. The trader enters in this strategy by buying a lower strike ITM call, selling an even lower striking ITM call, buying a higher strike OTM call and selling another even higher striking OTM call.

The Net credit of the premium is the maximum possible profit in this strategy. The maximum loss is equal to the difference in strike prices of the 2 lower striking calls less the initial credit taken to enter the trade.

  • Bear Call Spread meaning 2 calls. This includes sell 1 ITM Call and simultaneous buy one ITM Call (on the same underlying) with the same expiration date but a higher strike price.
  • Bull Call Spread meaning 2 calls. This includes buy 1 OTM Call, and the simultaneous sale of another OTM Call (on the same underlying) with the same expiration date but a higher strike price.
  • ITM is ‘In the money’ and OTM is ‘Out of the money’. For Nifty Spot Price at 10550, the 10400 Call Option is ITM and 10700 Call is OTM.

When to use Short Condor (Short Call Condor) strategy?

The Short Call Condor works well when you expect the price of the underlying to be very volatile. In other words, when the trader is anticipating massive price movements (in any direction) in the underlying during the lifetime of the options.

Example

Short Condor Example 1

Let’s take a simple example of an underlying stock trading at в‚№45 (spot price) in June. The option contracts for this stock are available at the following premium:

  • July 35 Call – в‚№11
  • July 40 Call – в‚№7
  • July 50 Call – в‚№2
  • July 55 Call – в‚№1

Lot size: 100 shares in 1 lot

    Sell 1 ITM Call

Sell July 35 Call = в‚№11*100 = в‚№1100

Buy 1 ITM Call (Higher Strike)

Buy July 40 Call = в‚№7 * 100 = в‚№700

Buy 1 OTM Call (Higher Strike)

Buy July 50 Call = в‚№2 * 100 = в‚№200

Sell 1 OTM Call

Sell July 55 Call = в‚№1 * 100 = в‚№100

Net Credit of Premium = 1100-700+100-200 = в‚№300

Maximum Possible Profit = Net Credit of Premium = в‚№300

Scenario 1: Stock price goes down to в‚№35

At this price all options expires worthless. Thus the net profit is в‚№300 which was received at the time of buying the strategy.

Scenario 2: Stock price reaches to в‚№55

July 35 Call (Short) = (35-55)*100 = -в‚№2000

July 40 Call (Long) = (55-40)*100 = +в‚№1500

July 55 Call (Short) = в‚№0

July 50 Call (Long) = (55-50)*100 = +в‚№500

Net Position = -2000+1500+0+500= в‚№0

Initial Credit: в‚№300

Maximum Profit: в‚№300 paid as net credit of premium at the time of buying the strategy.

Scenario 3: Stock price remain at в‚№45

July 35 Call (Short) = (35-45)*100 = -в‚№1000

July 40 Call (Long) = (45-40)*100 = +в‚№500

Initial Credit: +в‚№300

Net Profit (в‚№) = -1000+500+300 = -200

In this example, the maximum loss is suffered if the underlying stock price at expiration is anywhere between в‚№40 and в‚№50. Price movement outside the range в‚№40 – в‚№50 in any direction makes this trade to result in profits.

Example 2 – Bank Nifty

Orders Example NIFTY Strike Price
Buy 1 ITM Call NIFTY18APR10200CE
Sell 1 ITM Call (Lower Strike) NIFTY18APR10100CE
Buy 1 OTM Call NIFTY18APR10500PE
Sell 1 OTM Call (Higher Strike) NIFTY18APR10600PE
Short Call Condor Example Bank Nifty
Spot Price 8900
Lot Size 25
Short Call Condor Options Strategy
Strike Price(в‚№) Premium(в‚№) Premium Paid(в‚№)
Sell 1 ITM Call (Lower Strike) 8700 580 14500
Buy 1 ITM Call 8800 520 13000
Buy 1 OTM Call 9000 420 10500
Sell 1 OTM Call (Higher Strike) 9100 380 9500
Net Premium (580-520-420+380)
20
(20*25)
500
Upper Breakeven(в‚№) Strike Price of Highest Strike Short Call – Net Premium Paid
(9100-20)
9080
Lower Breakeven(в‚№) Strike Price of Lowest Strike Short Call + Net Premium Paid
(8700+20)
8720
Maximum Possible Profit(в‚№) Net Premium Paid 500
Net Payoff from position
On Expiry Bank NIFTY closes at 1 Short ITM Call (Lower Strike) (в‚№) 1 Long ITM Call (в‚№) 1 Long OTM Call (в‚№) 1 Short OTM Call (Higher Strike) (в‚№) Net Payoff (в‚№)
8400 14500 -13000 -10500 9500 500
8600 14500 -13000 -10500 9500 500
8720 14000 -13000 -10500 9500 0
8800 12000 -13000 -10500 9500 -2000
9000 7000 -8000 -10500 9500 -2000
9080 5000 -6000 -8500 9500 0
9200 2000 -3000 -5500 7000 500
9400 -3000 2000 -500 2000 500

Market View – Volatile

When you are unsure about the direction in the movement in the price of the underlying but are expecting high volatility in it in the near future.

Actions

Suppose Nifty is trading at 10,400. If you expect high volatility in the Nifty in the coming days then you can execute Short Call Condor by selling 1 ITM Nifty Call at 10,200, buying 1 ITM Call at 10,300, buying 1 OTM Call Option at 10, 500 and selling 1 OTM Nifty Call at 10, 600. Your maximum loss will be if Nifty closes in the range of 10,300 to 10,500 on expiry while maximum profit will be on either side of upper or lower strikes.

Risk Profile of Short Condor (Short Call Condor)

Limited

This is a limited risk strategy. The maximum risk in a short call condor strategy is calculated as below:

Max Loss = Strike Price of Lower Strike Long Call – Strike Price of Lower Strike Short Call – Net Premium Received + Commissions Paid

The max risk is when the price of the underlying remains in between strike price of 2 long calls.

Reward Profile of Short Condor (Short Call Condor)

Limited

The maximum profit in a short call condor strategy is realized when the price of the underlying is trading outside the range at time of expiration.

Max Profit = Strike Price of Lower Strike Short Call – Strike Price of Lower Strike Long Call – Net Premium Paid

Short condor spread with calls

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To profit from a stock price move up or down beyond the highest or lowest strike prices of the position.

Explanation

Example of short condor spread with calls

Sell 1 XYZ 95 call at 8.40 8.40
Buy 1 XYZ 100 call at 4.80 (4.80)
Buy 1 XYZ 105 call at 2.35 (2.35)
Sell 1 XYZ 110 call at 0.95 0.95
Net credit = 2.20

A short condor spread with calls is a four-part strategy that is created by selling one call at a lower strike price, buying one call with a higher strike price, buying another call with an even higher strike price and selling one more call with an even higher strike price. All calls have the same expiration date, and the strike prices are equidistant. In the example above, one 95 Call is sold, one 100 Call is purchased, one 105 Call is purchased, and one 110 Call is sold. This strategy is established for a net credit, and both the potential profit and maximum risk are limited. The maximum profit is equal to the net premium received less commissions, and it is realized if the stock price is above the higher strike price or below the lower strike price at expiration. The maximum risk equals the distance between the strike prices less the net premium received and is incurred if the stock price is between the middle two strike prices on the expiration date.

This is an advanced strategy because the profit potential is small in dollar terms and because “costs” are high. Given that there are four strike prices, there are multiple commissions and bid-ask spreads when opening the position and again when closing it. As a result, it is essential to open and close the position at “good prices.” It is also important to trade a condor at acceptable risk/reward ratios.

Maximum profit

The maximum profit potential is the net credit received less commissions, and there are two possible outcomes in which a profit of this amount is realized. If the stock price is below the lowest strike price at expiration, then all calls expire worthless and the net credit is kept as income. Also, if the stock price is above the highest strike price at expiration, then all calls are in the money and the condor spread position has a net value of zero. As a result, the net credit less commissions is kept as income.

Maximum risk

The maximum risk is equal to the difference between the strike prices less the net credit received minus commissions, and a loss of this amount is realized if the stock price is between the middle strike prices at expiration.

In the example above, the difference between the strike prices is 5.00, and the net credit received is 2.20, not including commissions. The maximum risk, therefore, is 2.80 less commissions.

Breakeven stock price at expiration

There are two breakeven points. The lower breakeven point is the stock price equal to the lowest strike price plus the net credit received. The upper breakeven point is the stock price equal to the highest strike price minus the net credit.

Profit/Loss diagram and table: short condor spread with calls

Sell 1 XYZ 95 call at 8.40 8.40
Buy 1 XYZ 100 call at 4.80 (4.80)
Buy 1 XYZ 105 call at 2.35 (2.35)
Sell 1 XYZ 110 call at 0.95 0.95
Net credit = 2.20
Stock Price at Expiration Short 1 95 Call Profit/(Loss) at Expiration Long 1 100 Call Profit/(Loss) at Expiration Long 1 105 Call Profit/(Loss) at Expiration Short 1 110 Call Profit/(Loss) At Expiration Net Profit/(Loss) at Expiration
115 (11.60) +10.20 +7.65 (4.05) +2.20
110 (6.60) +5.20 +2.65 +0.95 +2.20
105 (1.60) +0.20 (2.35) +0.95 (2.80)
100 +3.40 (4.80) (2.35) +0.95 (2.80)
95 +8.40 (4.80) (2.35) +0.95 +2.20
90 +8.40 (4.80) (2.35) +0.95 +2.20

Appropriate market forecast

A short condor spread with calls realizes its maximum profit if the stock price is above the highest strike or below the lowest strike on the expiration date. The forecast, therefore, must be for “high volatility,” i.e., a price move outside the range of the strike prices of the condor.

Strategy discussion

A short condor spread with calls is the strategy of choice when the forecast is for a stock price move outside the range of the highest and lowest strike prices. Unlike a long straddle or long strangle, however, the profit potential of a short condor spread is limited. Also, the commissions for a condor spread are higher than for a straddle or strangle. The tradeoff is that a short condor spread has breakeven points much closer to the current stock price than a comparable long straddle or long strangle.

Condor spreads are sensitive to changes in volatility (see Impact of Change in Volatility). The net price of a condor spread falls when volatility rises and rises when volatility falls. Consequently some traders establish a short condor spread when they believe that volatility is “low” and forecast that it will rise. Since the volatility in option prices typically rises as an earnings announcement date approaches and then falls immediately after the announcement, some traders will sell a condor spread seven to ten days before an earnings report and then close the position on the day before the report. Success of this approach to selling condor spreads requires that either the volatility in option prices rises or that the stock price rises or falls outside the strike price range. If the stock price remains constant and if implied volatility does not rise, then a loss will be incurred.

Patience and trading discipline are required when trading short condor spreads. Patience is required because this strategy profits from stock price movement and/or rising implied volatility, and stock price action can be unsettling as it rises and falls between the lower and upper strike prices as expiration approaches. Trading discipline is required, because, as expiration approaches, “small” changes in the underlying stock price can have a high percentage impact on the price of a condor spread. Traders must, therefore, be disciplined in taking partial profits if possible and also in taking “small” losses before the losses become “big.”

Impact of stock price change

“Delta” estimates how much a position will change in price as the stock price changes. Long calls have positive deltas, and short calls have negative deltas.

Regardless of time to expiration and regardless of stock price, the net delta of a condor spread remains close to zero until one or two days before expiration. If the stock price is below the lowest strike price in a short condor spread with calls, then the net delta is slightly negative. If the stock price is above the highest strike price, then the net delta is slightly positive. Overall, a short condor spread with calls profits from a stock price rise or fall outside the range of strike prices in the spread and is hurt by time decay.

Impact of change in volatility

Volatility is a measure of how much a stock price fluctuates in percentage terms, and volatility is a factor in option prices. As volatility rises, option prices tend to rise if other factors such as stock price and time to expiration remain constant. Long options, therefore, rise in price and make money when volatility rises, and short options rise in price and lose money when volatility rises. When volatility falls, the opposite happens; long options lose money and short options make money. “Vega” is a measure of how much changing volatility affects the net price of a position.

Short condor spreads with calls have a negative vega. This means that the price of a short condor spread falls when volatility rises (and the spread makes money). When volatility falls, the price of a short condor spread rises (and the spread loses money). Short condor spreads, therefore, should be established when volatility is “low” and forecast to rise.

Impact of time

The time value portion of an option’s total price decreases as expiration approaches. This is known as time erosion. “Theta” is a measure of how much time erosion affects the net price of a position. Long option positions have negative theta, which means they lose money from time erosion, if other factors remain constant; and short options have positive theta, which means they make money from time erosion.

A short condor spread with calls has a net negative theta – it loses from time decay – as long as the stock price is in a range between the lowest and highest strike prices. If the stock price moves out of this range, however, the theta becomes positive as expiration approaches.

Risk of early assignment

Stock options in the United States can be exercised on any business day, and holders of short stock option positions have no control over when they will be required to fulfill the obligation. Therefore, the risk of early assignment is a real risk that must be considered when entering into positions involving short options.

While the long calls (middle two strike prices) in a short condor spread have no risk of early assignment, the short calls do have such risk. Early assignment of stock options is generally related to dividends. Short calls that are assigned early are generally assigned on the day before the ex-dividend date. In-the-money calls whose time value is less than the dividend have a high likelihood of being assigned.

If one short call is assigned (most likely the lowest-strike short call), then 100 shares of stock are sold short and the long calls (middle two strikes) and the other short call remain open. If a short stock position is not wanted, it can be closed in one of two ways. First, 100 shares can be purchased in the marketplace. Second, the short 100-share position can be closed by exercising the lowest-strike long call. Remember, however, that exercising a long call will forfeit the time value of that call. Therefore, it is generally preferable to buy shares to close the short stock position and then sell a long call. This two-part action recovers the time value of the long call. One caveat is commissions. Buying shares to cover the short stock position and then selling the long call is only advantageous if the commissions are less than the time value of the long call.

If both of the short calls are assigned, then 200 shares of stock are sold short and the long calls remain open. Again, if a short stock position is not wanted, it can be closed in one of two ways. Either 200 shares can be purchased in the marketplace, or both long calls can be exercised. However, as discussed above, since exercising a long call forfeits the time value, it is generally preferable to buy shares to close the short stock position and then sell the long calls. The caveat, as mentioned above, is commissions. Buying shares to cover the short stock position and then selling the long calls is only advantageous if the commissions are less than the time value of the long calls.

Note, however, that whichever method is used, buying stock and selling a long call or exercising a long call, the date of the stock purchase will be one day later than the date of the short sale. This difference will result in additional fees, including interest charges and commissions. Assignment of a short option might also trigger a margin call if there is not sufficient account equity to support the stock position created.

Potential position created at expiration

The position at expiration of a short condor spread with calls depends on the relationship of the stock price to the strike prices of the spread. If the stock price is below the lowest strike price, then all calls expire worthless, and no position is created.

If the stock price is above the lowest strike and at or below the second-lowest strike, then the lowest strike short call is assigned, and the other three calls expire worthless. The result is that 100 shares of stock are sold short and a stock position of short 100 shares is created.

If the stock price is above the second-lowest strike and at or below the second-highest strike, then the lowest strike short call is assigned and the second-lowest strike long call is exercised. The result is that 100 shares are purchased and 100 shares are sold. The net result is no position, although one stock buy commission and one stock sell commission have been incurred.

If the stock price is above the second-highest strike and at or below the highest strike, then the lowest-strike short call is assigned, and both long calls are exercised. The result is that 100 shares are sold and 200 shares are purchased. The net result is a stock position of long 100 shares.

If the stock price is above the highest strike, then both short calls (lowest and highest strikes) are assigned and both long calls (middle two strikes) are exercised. The result is that 200 shares are purchased and 200 shares are sold. The net result is no position, although two stock buy and sell commissions have been incurred.

Other considerations

A short condor spread with calls can also be described as the combination of a bear call spread and a bull call spread. The bear call spread is the short lowest-strike call combined with the second-lowest strike long call, and the bull call spread is the second-highest strike long call combined with the short highest-strike call.

The term “condor” in the strategy name is thought to have originated from the profit-loss diagram. A condor is a bird with an exceptionally long wing span for its body size. The horizontal line representing the range of maximum profit in the middle of the diagram for a long condor spread looks vaguely like the body a condor and the horizontal lines stretching out above the highest strike and below the lowest strike look vaguely like the wings of a condor. A short condor spread looks vaguely like an upside-down condor.

A long condor spread with calls is a four-part strategy that is created by buying one call at a lower strike price, selling one call with a higher strike price, selling another call with an even higher strike price and buying one more call with an even higher strike price.

A short condor spread with puts is a four-part strategy that is created by selling one put at a higher strike price, buying one put with a lower strike price, buying another put with an even lower strike price and selling one more put with an even lower strike price.

Article copyright 2020 by Chicago Board Options Exchange, Inc (CBOE). Reprinted with permission from CBOE. The statements and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author. Fidelity Investments cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any statements or data.

Options trading entails significant risk and is not appropriate for all investors. Certain complex options strategies carry additional risk. Before trading options, please read Characteristics and Risks of Standardized Options. Supporting documentation for any claims, if applicable, will be furnished upon request.

Charts, screenshots, company stock symbols and examples contained in this module are for illustrative purposes only.

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